How a Single NGO Internship Could Impact #ZeroHunger

Wednesday the 16th of October, it’s #WorldFoodDay. This day is one of the most celebrated days on the UN calendar. It promotes awareness and action for those who suffer from hunger and for the need to ensure healthy diets for all. So what’s the need for a day like this? Well, achieving Zero Hunger by 2030 – one of the UN goals – is not only about feeding the hungry. It’s also about nourishing people, by calling for action across sectors to make healthy and sustainable diets affordable and accessible to everyone.

As the Marketing & Communications intern at Roots Interns, I was well aware of the impact small organizations can have on our communities. I wanted to find out what our partner organizations were doing to help achieve #ZeroHunger – and it was quite a lot! Today, I’m taking you with me while exploring the different NGO internships fighting for a healthy and sustainable world.

Curious about our other environmental internships? Have a look!

    

Permaculture: Long-term Sustainability and Renewability

Let’s start by exploring Permaculture. Permaculture is working on long-term sustainability in human culture. Therefore, it is not just agriculture/farming. It is also about using our existing resources, engineering and much more. It’s connected to the UN goal of #ZeroHunger by making healthy and sustainable diets affordable and accessible to everyone – especially in the long run!

Ghana Permaculture Institute promotes permaculture principles in the surrounding areas. Overall, their aim is to stimulate productivity in the local communities while working to maintain a natural ecosystem. The institute offers training to local farmer groups in all types of areas. As their Permaculture intern, you’ll assist with these training programs, and help with specific ecological projects happening at the time!

Malawi Schools Permaculture Club is a nonprofit teaching permaculture principles to children in Malawi. They provide relevant training for their teachers and a structured club program for them to follow. Overall, their aim is to teach children how to care for and regenerate their natural environment, to value their local resources, and to learn how to produce their own nutritious food. As a Media and Communications intern, you’ll get their word out in creative ways so they can educate many more children!

Sounds great, right? Enquire now and start making an impact right away!

    

Horticulture: Plants and Veggies for Commercial Consumption

Next up! Horticulture sounds similar to permaculture, but there’s a difference. While permaculture focuses on all aspects of human culture, horticulture is about growing plants (mostly vegetables) for personal/commercial consumption. That makes it similar to permaculture in its connection to the UN goal; making healthy and sustainable diets affordable and accessible to everyone.

Hlumelelisa offers horticulture training in prisons and to youth-at-risk in Johannesburg. They aim to equip people with horticulture, entrepreneurial, and life skills so that they have a higher chance of finding work and becoming fully reintegrated into the community after their release. The projects also help to create a greener, safer, and more beautiful South Africa. As their NGO Management intern, you might work on fundraising, system development, or categorizing data. As their Communications & Digital Media intern, you’ll create content for their channels, write impact reports, and help with website developments.

Urban Harvest installs, maintains, and supports organic food gardens in South Africa. Therefore, they make it easy for South Africans to grow their own fresh, nutrient-rich, and chemical-free food. They believe that by helping South Africans to grow their own food, they are supporting a healthier, happier, and more sustainable way of life for everyone. You can start as their Food Security and Urban Farming intern, where your main focus will be the school gardens. You’ll facilitate eco-education workshops for the children, evaluate the current systems, and develop new/improved systems to optimize the produce and use of the school garden.

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