What it’s like to believe in the power of photography

I sit and stare at my computer screen, which I do almost every day. The Twitter feed scrolls and scrolls, while I continue to question my worth. My ability to get the job done. How can you attain the public’s attention? How can I, a 22-year-old American intern, somehow manage to get our name out there? I joined this company because I believed in it. Because I wanted to make a difference. Because I believe the power of photography can change someone’s life.

I stop. Think. Do I really believe that? Or is that just what I’ve been programmed to feel?

I stop. Think. How can I, a 22-year-old American intern, somehow manage to get our name out there? At 17, I never would have believed I’d make it this far. In life, in age, in maturity. At 17, I had no grasp on reality, no talent of expression. I was a privileged young girl, without a healthy way to express my emotions.

I stop. Think. Remember. If you are an artist, I’m sure you recall the first time you felt like your work mattered.

My first photographs were terrible. I used my mother’s digital camera to take pictures of my friends in the park. I remember the color of the autumn leaves, the rough feel of tree bark, the way the sun sparkled in golden wisps of blonde hair.

My first photographs were terrible. But that does not matter. That day in the park, I discovered a way to open up to the world around me. To express my view – my own, individual view – to the world around me.

I am the Marketing and Communications coordinator for Penda Photo Tours. The reason I am here, tweeting all day in an office in Cape Town, is because I believe in the power of photography. I am here because I believe in the Penda Trust to support ongoing photography workshops throughout South Africa and Zambia.

Photography helped me to shape my own life. I know it can do the same for others.

Love, Regina

SCreen

Keen to follow in Regina’s footsteps? Check out the Marketing Internship and Content Writing Internship at Penda.